DEPARTMENT OF ELECTRICAL AND ELECTRONIC ENGINEERING


BSc ELECTRICAL AND ELECTRONIC ENGINEERING

1.         Aims and Objectives:

 

Aim:

1.      To provide a comprehensive electrical and electronic engineering education that prepares students for a successful engineering practice and advanced studies.

2.      To develop the abilities of students for the application of the necessary practical tools, scientific basics and fundamental knowledge of electrical and electronic engineering.

 

Objectives: 

The main objectives of the programme are:

1.      To provide students with a solid foundation in the electrical, electronics, telecommunications, and control engineering.

2.      To develop the professional skills in the students and prepare them for immediate employment in the field of electrical and electronic engineering.

3.      To provide students with the requisite skills for the dynamic and rapidly changing electrical and electronic engineering market.

4.      To provide students with a wholesome foundation that prepares students for leadership roles along diverse carrier paths in established companies as well as embark on entrepreneurial ventures concerned with power and energy, telecommunication, industrial control and electronics.

5.      To provide students with a solid foundation for research and postgraduate studies.

 

2.         Components of each Programme of Study:

 

(a)             All courses are mandatory throughout the programme;

(b)               Students are required to submit a project report based on their project work;

(c)                Practical Training, Industrial Attachment and Fieldtrips to Industrial and Mining establishments; and

(d)               Semester-by-semester schedule of courses showing the credit value of each course.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Year One Semester One

Course No.

Subject

T

P

C

EL 141

EL 151

EL 155

EL 157

EL 159

EL 163

EL 167

EL 169

       EL 171

Basic French I*

Applied Electricity*

Technical Drawing*

Communication Skills I

Introduction to Computing*

Introduction to Programming with C++

Basic Mechanics*

Linear Algebra*

Electrical Engineering Drawing

1

2

1

2

1

1

2

2

1

1

2

3

1

2

4

2

2

2

1

3

2

2

2

2

3

3

2

Totals

13

19

20

 

 

Year One Semester Two

Course No.

Subject

T

P

C

EL 142

        EL 152

EL 156

EL 158

EL 162

EL 166

EL 172

EL 174

Basic French II*

Strength of Materials

Engineering Drawing*

Communication Skills II*

Circuit Theory

Calculus*

Instruments and Measurements

Semiconductor Devices

1

2

2

2

2

2

2

2

1

2

2

1

2

2

1

2

1

3

3

2

3

3

2

3

Totals

15

13

20

 

 

Year Two Semester One

Course No.

Subject

T

P

C

EL 251

EL 261

EL 265

EL 267

EL 271

        EL 273

EL 275

        EL 277

Literature in English I*

Object Oriented Programming with C++

Differential Equations

Thermodynamics

Computer Graphics

Electromagnetic Field Theory

Transformers

 Linear Electronics

1

       2

2

2

1

2

2

2

1

       2

2

2

3

2

1

1

1

       3

3

3

2

3

2

2

Totals

14

14

19

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Year Two Semester Two

Course No.

Subject

T

P

C

EL 252

EL 256

EL 260

EL 264

        EL 270

EL 272

EL 274

EL 276

EL 278 

Literature in English II*

Fieldtrip and Technical Report Writing I*

Mathematical Analysis

Fluid Mechanics

Basic Material Science

Workshop Technology and Practice

DC Machines

Matlab/Simulink for Engineers

Digital Electronics

1

1

2

2

       2

       2

       2

       1

       2

1

1

2

2

       1

       1

2

3

1

1

1

3

3

       2

       2

3

2

2

 

Totals

13

14

      19

* Fieldtrips may be organised in either semester but the results shall be credited only at the second

   semester.

 

 

 

Year Three Semester One

Course No.

Subject

T

P

C

EL 361

EL 363

EL 365

EL 371

EL 373

EL 375

EL 377

EL 379

Probability and Statistics*

Numerical Analysis*`

Environmental Management*

Power Generation and Supply

Control Systems

AC Machines

Industrial Electronics

Power Electronics

2

2

2

2

2

2

2

2

1

1

2

1

2

2

1

1

2

2

3

2

3

3

2

2

Totals

16

11

19

 

 

Year Three Semester Two

Course No.

Subject

T

P

C

EL 352

 EL 356*

EL 372

EL 374

EL 376

EL 378

EL 380

EL 382

 

Public Relations*

Fieldtrip and Technical Report Writing II*

Utilisation of Electrical Power

Electrical Drives Systems

Basic Communications Systems

Programming in Lab View

High Voltage Engineering

Microprocessors and Digital Control Systems

2

0

2

2

2

1

2

2

0

4

1

2

1

3

1

2

2

1

2

3

2

2

2

3

Totals

13

14

17

* Field trips may be organised in either semester but the results shall be credited only at the

   second semester.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Year Four Semester One

Course No.

Subject

T

P

C

EL 451

EL 459

EL 461

EL 463

EL 465

EL 467

EL 471

        EL 473

Research Methods and Ethics in Science*

Operations Research*

Principles of Economics*

Digital Signal and Image Processing

Artificial Intelligence

Instrumentation and Control

Power Systems Protection and Control

Advanced Communications Systems

2

2

2

2

2

2

2

       2

0

2

0

2

1

2

1

       1

2

3

2

3

2

3

2

       2

Totals

16

9

19

 

 

Year Four Semester Two

Course No.

Subject

T

P

C

EL 450

EL 452

EL 454

EL 458

EL 460

EL 462

EL 464

EL 472

Project Work*

Colloquium/Seminar*

Business Entrepreneurship*

Principles of Management*

Corporate Social Responsibility*

Industrial and Maintenance Engineering

Robotics

Electric Haulage Machinery

0

1

2

2

2

2

2

2

12

1

0

0

0

2

2

1

4

1

2

2

2

3

3

2

Totals

13

18

19

 

·                     T - Teaching Hours

·                     P - Hours for Practicals, Tutorials, Laboratory Work, Fieldwork, etc.

·                     C - Credit Hours

 



EL 171 Electrical Engineering Drawing (1, 2, 2)

Objectives

The primary purpose of this course is to equip students with various types of electrical engineering drawings, symbols of electrical and electronic components, blueprint readingandElectrical Engineering drawing standards. Students are to apply knowledge of Electrical Engineering drawing and its applications to the realisation of standard circuit diagrams, wiring diagrams, electrical power diagrams, etc. The course will introduce students to the use of Computer Aided Design (CAD) tools in Electrical Engineering drawing.

Content

Overview:Representation of electrical ideas. Characteristics of electrical engineering diagrams.Standardisation.Diagrams:block diagrams. Circuit diagrams. Wiring diagrams. Electrical power diagrams. Electrical diagrams for architectural plans and designs. Flow charts and organisational charts.Tree diagrams; ladder diagrams and logic circuits.Breadboards and printed circuit boards.Application of PSpice, AutoCAD, Microsoft Office Visio and electronic workbench in electrical engineering drawing.

Reading Material

a)      Bhattacharya, S. K. (2007), Electrical Engineering Drawing, New Age International, 252 pp. ISBN-13: 978 8122408553.

b)      Gibilisco, S. (2013), Beginner’s Guide to Reading Schematics, McGraw-Hill/TAB Electronics, 3rd edition, 182pp. ISBN-13: 987-0071827782.

Zachariason, R. (2009), Blueprint Reading for Electricians, Cengage Learning, 3rd edition, 464 pp. ISBN-13: 987-1435491199.

EL 169 Linear Algebra (2, 2, 3)

Objectives

The purpose of the course is to help students to solve linear, quadratic, radical, exponential, logarithmic, polynomial and rational equations and inequalities; use matrix operations to solve systems of equations and be able to determine the nature of the solutions; solve problems in complex numbers

Content

Matrix algebra: Determinants. Systems of linear equations and their solutions by matrix methods.  Consistency of systems of linear equations.  Eigenvalues and eigenvectors. Vector algebra: Scalar products. Vector products. Scalar triple products. Vector triple products. Geometrical applications of vectors. Complex algebra: The Argand diagram. De Moivre’s theorem and its applications (solution of polynomial equations, summation of series). Sequences and series. 

Reading Material

a)      Beezer, R. A. (2012),A First Course in Linear Algebra,Congruent Press

b)      Blyth, T.S. andRobertson, E.F. (2002), Basic Linear Algebra, Springer Undergraduate Mathematics Series

c)      David, C.L (2012), Linear Algebra and Its Applications 4th edition,Pearson


EL 167 Basic Mechanics (2, 2, 3)

 Objectives

The course should enable students to impart knowledge on the vector and scalar representation of forces and moments. Students will have knowledge on static equilibrium of particles and rigid bodies both in two and three dimensions. They would also understand the principle of work and energy; comprehend on the effect of friction on equilibrium, the laws of motion, the kinematic of motion and the interrelationship.

Content

Fundamental concepts: Newton’s laws of motion; force systems and characteristics of forces; moment of a force; vector representation of forces and moments. Basic statics: Equilibrium of rigid bodies in two and three dimensions.. Structural analysis: The method of joints and the method of sections. Friction; Simple machines; Basic dynamics of particles. Basic dynamics of rigid bodies; Simple harmonic motion.

 

 

 

Reading Material

a)   Beer, F. P. and Russell, J. (2007), VectorMechanics of Machines (Statics and Dynamics), 8th Edition, McGraw Hill, New York, 1355 pp.

b)  Morrisson, J. M. and Crossland, B. (1970), An Introduction to the Mechanics of Machines,SI Edition, Longman Higher Education Publishers, United Kingdom, 470 pp.

c)  Spiegel, L. and Limbrunner, G. (1995), Applied Statics and Strength of Materials, 2nd Edition, Prentice Hall, N. J., 758 pp.


EL 163 Introduction to Programming with C++ (1, 4, 2)

Objectives

The course presents basics of C/C++ programming including: Basics of C/C++ environment, Data representation, Control structures, Functions, Arrays, Pointers, Strings, and Classes that aims to:

·         Arm the students with the basic programming concepts;

·         Introduce different techniques pertaining to problem solving skills;

·         Arm the students with the necessary constructs of C/C++ programming;

·         And to emphasise on guided practical sessions.

Content

Understanding and using the basic programming constructs of C/C++ such as operators and expressions, standard C/C++ preprocessor, standard C/C++ library and conditional program execution and program looping and Iteration. Manipulating various C/C++ data types, such as arrays, strings, and pointers and isolating and fixing common errors in C++ programs. Using memory appropriately, including proper allocation/de-allocation procedures, Appling object-oriented approaches to software problems in C++, and Writing small-scale C++ programs.

 

Reading Material

a)      Malik, D. S. (2009), C++ Programming: Program Design including Data StructureCourse Technology, Cengage Learning, 4th edition.  ISBN-13: 978-1-4239-0222-5;

b)      Asthana, A. (  ), C++ For Beginners . . . Masters,  New Age International (Pte) Ltd., ISBN (13) : 978-81-224-2628-1;

c)      Deitel, H. M. and Deitel. P. J. (2012),  C++: How to Program, 5th edition. ISBN 0-13-185757-6;

Lafore, R. (  ), Object Oriented Programming in C++, 3rd edition, MacMillian Computer Publishing. ISBN 151769160x.

EL 159 Introduction to Computing (1, 2, 2)

Objectives

This course is designed to introduce students to how to use computers to process information and create documents and have knowledge in basic information technology and principles of application programs.

Content

Introduction to PCs. Windows operating system. Internet usage. Word processing using MS word. Spreadsheet using MS Excel. Introduction to Programming using Visual Basic Applications (VBA).

Reading Material

a)      Cox, J. and Preppernau, C. F. F. (2008), Microsoft Office System Step by Step, 2nd edition, Microsoft Press, Washington.

b)      Yadav, D. S. (2003), Foundation of Information Technology, New Age International.

c)      French, C. S. (2000), Computer Science, 5th Edition, New York.

d)     Jones, S. P. (1987), The Implementation of Functional Programming Languages, Prentice Hall.


Objectives

All undergraduate students should have the capacity to write clearly and concisely. Academic writing will expose the student to Basic English grammar, composition and essay writing. Students will also be exposed to preparation of summaries, citation and referencing, oral presentation and interpersonal skills.

Content

Introduction to communication: methods and systems of communication. Pre-writing skills: developing listening skills, note-taking and note-making, developing reading skills. Developing writing skills (I): Sentence level (the sentence as an ordered string of words, the simple sentence, basic sentence patterns, common grammatical errors). Coordination and parallelism. Ambiguity and conventions of usage. 

Reading Material

a)      Downing, A., and Locke, P. (2005), English Grammar A University Course, 2nd edition,Routledge.

b)      Adolinama, P. P. (2003), Handbook of Business and Technical Communication, UST Press, Kumasi, 167 pp.

c)      Gborsong, P. A. (2001), A Comprehensive Guide to Communication Skills for Undergraduate Students and Secretaries, Book1, Cape Coast, 160 pp.

Opoku-Agyemang, N. J. (1998), A Handbook for Writing Skills, GUP, Accra, 143 pp.



EL 155 Technical Drawing (1, 3, 2)

Objective

This course will equip students with general concepts about technical drawing, drawing instruments and materials.

Content

Lettering with inclined and vertical strokes. Word spacing and compositions. Tangency. Descriptive geometry. General loci. First and third angle orthogonal projections. Dimensioning.

Reading Material

a)      Bogolyubov, S. and Voinov, A. (2001), Engineering Drawing: A Course for Technical Schools of Mechanical Engineering, first edition, University Press Of The Pacific, India.

b)      Mathur, M. L. and Vaishwanar,R. S.(1990), A Text Book of Engineering Drawing, 4th edition, Private Publication, Madras.

c)      Hart, K. R. (1975), Engineering Drawing, with Problems and Solutions, English Universities Press (London), pp.188.



Objectives

The course aims at introducing students to electrical circuit theorems, circuit topologies, capacitance and electrostatics, magnetic circuits and basic alternating current (AC) theory. The course also aims to prepare students for more advanced courses in circuit analysis (Circuit Theory).Practical electrical circuit principles are also introduced through laboratory sessions. The laboratory work is also designed to introduce students to the use of measuring instruments to measure basic electrical quantities.

Content

Circuit Laws: Ohm’s law. Kirchhoff’s laws and network solution. Circuit laws and theorems (Analysis Methods). Electrostatics and capacitance. Electromagnetism. Magnetic circuits. Inductance in an AC Circuit. Alternating current and voltage. Signal waveforms. Transformers and electrical machines. Laboratory work.

Reading Material

a)      Bird,  J. (2013), Electrical and Electronic Principles and Technology, 5th  edition, Routledge, Great Britain, 464 pp.

b)      Hebert, W. J. (2012), Introduction to Electric Circuits, Prentice Hall, India, 411 pp.

c)      Theraja, B. L. and Theraja, A. K. (2008), A Textbook of Electrical Technology, 24th  revised edition, S. Chand & Company, New Delhi, 2782 pp.


EL 141 Basic French I(1, 1, 1)

 

Objective

This course provides students with the basic knowledge in French to enable them broaden their horizon to explore in neighboring countries.

Content

Establish one’s identity: Greetings and polite expression, introducing oneself and other. The Francophone World: The place of French in the world; Francophone countries and La Francophone. Time and Weather: Days of the week, months of the year; telling the time on the clock. Telling the weather; weather forecast. The Family/Professions: Members of the family, one’s place in the family; professions/trades of parents. Health and Sports: Parts of the body stating where one is suffering from; common diseases and medications; Health facilities.  

Reading Material

 

a)      Boularés, M. and Frérot, J. L. (1997), Grammaire progressive du francais. Niveauavancé CLE international

b)      Gregiore, M. and Thiévenaz, O. (1995), Grammaire progressive du Francais. Niveauintermédiare. CLE international

c)      Guimbretiére, E. (1992), Paroles Paris. Didier/Hatier

d)     Kaneman-Pougatch, M. (1991), Plaisir des Sons, Paris Hatier/Didier